BCS #1- Iambic Pentameter

5/31/17

Timer- “Bring It On Home To Me” -Sam Cooke(1965, 2:47) 

Opener-

  1. Make a name tag for your desk
  2. Text Code- put a sash/ between each syllable.
    • ex- put/a/slash/be/tween/each/syll/a/ble
    • Count the syllables in the following line from “Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare
    • Clap it out if you need to.
  • “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore* art thou Romeo?” Count _____

Romeo & Juliet

  • SLT’s- 

  • SLT- I can identify how Shakespeare uses iambic pentameter to create a flow to his writing.

    • Circle Verbs, Underline Nouns

Mini-Lesson

  • Who is William Shakespeare and should I learn about him today?

  • What is “iambic pentameter”?

iamb- in poetry, it means a foot or two syllables in which one is stressed and the next is unstressed.

penta- 10

meter- in poetry, a rhythm or flow

  • So “Iambic pentameter” is a flow of 10 syllables in which one is stressed and the next is unstressed. It sounds like a HEARTBEAT, and it brings life to Shakespeare’s words.

Model -Let’s look at the opener again – “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore* art thou Romeo?”

is it: I decide

  • “Ro/me/o, Ro/me/o, where/fore/ art/ thou/ Ro/me/o?” Count- 13

or, is it

  • “Ro/meo, Ro/meo. where/fore/ art/ though/ Ro/meo?” Count- 10Part II-
  • What does it mean to have a syllable that is stressed or unstressed?

    Stressed syllables said by adding a little emphasis/extra to a syllable

    Unstressed- said plainly

    Examples- ICE cream vs. i SCREAM,

    Model- So let’s go back to the opener again- Do we stress like this?: I decide

    • “Ro/meo, Ro/meo. where/fore/ art/ though/ Ro/meo?” –

    Or like this?

    • Ro/meo, Ro/meo. where/fore/ art/ though/ Ro/meo?”

    Some Tips-

    • Find the MOST Important word in the line,
    • Find the MOST important syllable in that word.
    • Stress it.
    • Leave the syllables on either side unstressed
    • Work to make a pattern

Practice-

Directions: Work with a partner to:

  • Separate the syllables in each famous Shakespeare Quote.
  • Put an “—” over syllables that are stressed
  • Put an “o” over syllables that are unstressed.

-Choose 5

1- “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo” –Romeo and Juliette

2- “A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!” –Richard III

3- “Everyone can master a grief but he that has it” –Much Ado About Nothing

4- “But love is blind, and lovers cannot see.”- Merchant of Venice

5- “Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under ‘t.” –Macbeth

6- “The robbed that smiles steals something from the thief” –Othello

Today we’re going to begin Text Coding Our Books As We Read.

 

Exit ticket I-

  1. Pick one of the quotes from above and interpret what you think it means in your own words.

 

 

Exit II- Please answer ONE of the questions on the inside of your name tag:

  1. Who is William Shakespeare and why do we still learn about him today?
  2. What is iambic pentameter?

 

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